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WINTER MIGHT TASTE A LITTLE DIFFERENT

WINTER MIGHT TASTE A LITTLE DIFFERENT

There's no lack of enthusiasm surrounding this snowmobile season. Sales of new sleds have been heroic and most dealers are sold to the bare walls.

Used sleds are in such high demand several dealers we know have waiting lists. For those on the waiting list, better get ready to spend inordinately high sums for a good, late model ride.

So it would seem there's a ton of riders (and possibly many new riders) chomping at the bit to head out onto the trails and enjoy some freedom from the city and the constant COVID threat. That's good and for the most part, in most jurisdictions, the trails will be opened and groomed in line with past year's timing, depending on winter's arrival, of course.

Here's one thing that isn't so easily understood or guaranteed as we stare down the beginning of the 20/21 season: Food. Maybe more specifically, "on-trail services".

In a number of North American jurisdictions restaurants are only allowed to open on a reduced capacity basis or to provide take-out food service. Where we ride, this likely means bring your lunch. During a normal season, popular on trail pit stops are most often packed to the walls with hungry, cold and in-need-of-a-washroom sledders.

If what appears imminent materializes this winter there will be a run on the OEM's factory luggage and backpacks. It's also going to be important for snowmobile clubs to increase the number of comfort stations at trail heads.

So get ready to pack some power bars, a sandwich, some bottled water and a thermos of coffee in the event your lunch destination is lined up out the doors.

There might be an upside to this challenge. What about food trucks at trail heads and busy trail intersections? They could provide enough extra food service to get everyone topped-up with a burger and fries and warmed-up with a hot drink.

A thirty-below day might present some challenges but we're snowmobilers and we are tough, right?