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2009 YAMAHA APEX

2009 YAMAHA APEX

A ten-year-old sled, if you can find a really good one, represents good value and can provide comfort and reliability at a fraction of the price of a new sled. If you're looking for used iron, here's a few suggestions in no particular order:

These sleds were anvils and we don't just mean because they were heavy!

In 2006 the Apex was introduced – a rider forward variation of the old RX-1. Even without the big 4-stroke under the hood, this all-aluminum platform was heavy, over-built and extremely strong, especially in the belly, bulkhead and engine bay area.

Shoehorning a huge 4-cylinder 4-stroke in there was a challenge and its confined engine bay and difficulty reaching it makes it a chore for owners to do any kind of tuning, repairs or modifications.

This may actually be a good thing because we're strong proponents of used sled purchases this age being completely stock, not home-built hot-rods.

The Apex engine is a masterpiece of Swiss-watch precision and has an excellent reliability record. Unless the used one you’re shopping has had unbelievable abuse, you should expect no problems with the engine.

Meanwhile, these sleds did not have a roller secondary so backshifting is not the greatest and it will likely need a clutch refurb after 5,000 miles to replace sliders and flyweights in the primary. Nothing drastic there, but ask if it’s been done.

Used Apexes hold their value really well so you may pay a bit more than expected for a good one. We recommend this choice for someone who exclusively rides trails and doesn’t spend much time in powder or climbing hills.

Weight is the deal-breaker here and since the Apex is purpose built for groomed trails, you might be disappointed in its limitations when used off-trail.

Nevertheless, an Apex is a good choice for all-round reliability and value.

We give it 4 stars out of 5 on the used sled scale.